Issue 3 - April 2019 The [Un]Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: A Critique of Henson v. Santander

The [Un]Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: A Critique of Henson v. Santander

Article by: Monica Paladini 46 PEPP. L. REV. 587 (2019) Congress was clear about its purposes and motivations behind enacting the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act of 1977. Namely, it set out to protect consumers from abusive debt collectors and to protect ethical debt collectors from being competitively disadvantaged by those who employ abusive tactics. …

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Issue 3 - April 2019 The Locke Exception: What Trinity Lutheran Means for the Future of State Blaine Amendments

The Locke Exception: What Trinity Lutheran Means for the Future of State Blaine Amendments

Article by: Christopher Tyler Prosser 46 PEPP. L. REV. 623 (2019) At its core, this Article is about whether states have the discretion to discriminate against religious organizations by excluding them from generally available secular government aid programs. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2004 decision in Locke v. Davey, the federal courts have …

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2018 Annual Volume “It Ain’t So Much the Things We Don’t Know That Get Us in Trouble. It’s the Thing We Know that Aint’s So”: The Dubious Intellectual Foundations of the Claim that “Hate Speech” Causes Political Violence

“It Ain’t So Much the Things We Don’t Know That Get Us in Trouble. It’s the Thing We Know that Aint’s So”: The Dubious Intellectual Foundations of the Claim that “Hate Speech” Causes Political Violence

Article by: Gordon Danning 2018 PEPP. L. REV. 98 (2018) The United States is an outlier in its legal protection for what is commonly termed “hate speech.” Proponents of bringing American jurisprudence closer to the international norm often argue that hate speech causes violence, particularly political violence.  However, such claims largely rest on assumptions which are inconsistent …

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Issue 2 - February 2019 The Blue Devil’s In the Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work

The Blue Devil’s In the Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work

Article by: David A. Grenardo 46 PEPP. L. REV. 203 (2019) Everyone involved in the business of major college athletics, except the athletes, receives compensation based on a free market system. The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) cap on athlete compensation violates antitrust law, and athletes should be allowed to earn their free market value as everyone else …

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Issue 2 - February 2019 Taxing the Robots

Taxing the Robots

Article by: Orly Mazur 46 PEPP. L. REV. 277 (2019) Robots and other artificial intelligence-based technologies are increasingly outperforming humans in jobs previously thought safe from automation. This has led to growing concerns about the future of jobs, wages, economic equality, and government revenues. To address these issues, there have been multiple calls around the world to …

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Issue 2 - February 2019 The Court Can’t Even Handle Me Right Now: The Arpaio Pardon and Its Effect on the Scope of Presidential Pardons

The Court Can’t Even Handle Me Right Now: The Arpaio Pardon and Its Effect on the Scope of Presidential Pardons

Article by: Tyler Brown 46 PEPP. L. REV. 331 (2019) The Constitution grants the president the power to pardon individuals for offenses against the United States. Courts have interpreted this power broadly, and the American public has historically accepted its use, even in the face of several controversial pardons over the last five decades. However, after …

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