Derek Muller, “Evenwel v. Abbott: A New Attempt to Define ‘One Person, One Vote,'” George Washington L. Rev. Docket

April 15, 2016 — Pepperdine Law professor Derek Muller‘s article “Evenwel v. Abbott: A New Attempt to Define ‘One Person, One Vote'” has been published in the George Washington Law Review Docket (Apr. 5, 2016).

From “Evenwel v. Abbott: A New Attempt to Define ‘One Person, One Vote'”:

“One person, one vote” is a popular mantra, one nearly inviolable in our American jurisprudence. But what that mantra means is another matter. It has generally been understood that representative bodies, such as state legislatures, must draw districts with roughly equal numbers of people in them. In its decision in Evenwel v. Abbott, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that people, not voters, may be the basis for drawing legislative districts—and left for another day whether this is be the only permissible basis for drawing districts, albeit with some clues for future litigants.

Read the article at the George Washington Law Review website.

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